PhotoshopForums.com Home
Navigate Contact Contact FAQ Search Members Profile Register Login
Add PhotoshopForums.com
Username:    Password:
Remember Me?    
   I Lost My Password!
Photoshop as a cloths iron
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PhotoshopForums.com Forum Index -> Manipulation
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 See a User Guidelines violation? Please contact us.
Author Message

Netaddict

Joined: 16 Feb 2011
Posts: 332
Location: Earth
PS Version: CS6
OS: Windows 7 Professional

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2011 12:32 am    Post subject: Photoshop as a cloths iron Reply with quote

Attached is an image I found online with the before and after versions. Has the "ironing" been done through photoshop or do you thing that a new ironed suit has been pasted over the wrinkled one? That leads me to another question: how do you find a picture of exactly the same suite worn in the same position as it is in the original image?


photoshop ironing.jpeg
 Description:
 Filesize:  53.47 KB
 Viewed:  1386 Time(s)

photoshop ironing.jpeg


View user's profile Send private message

SCTRWD

Joined: 20 Jul 2011
Posts: 78



PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2011 2:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is simple. Select wrinkled area and apply Filter->Blur->Smart Blur or Surface Blur.
View user's profile Send private message

thehermit

Joined: 05 Mar 2003
Posts: 3945
Location: Cheltenham, UK


PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2011 4:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would steer clear of the blur method altogether as it does not produce the result you want, and I challenge anyone to get close by doing so.

Really the only way I know that is effective is splitting the frequency of the image, into low and high pass. You do this by using the apply image command, I give a brief explanation in this thread Split Frequency The settings are different for 16bit images and if you need the settings or more details shout back.

To remove creases, work only on the low frequency layer and unify the tones. I can provide more info and a demo if needed.

_________________
If life serves you lemons, make lemonade!
View user's profile Send private message

Netaddict

Joined: 16 Feb 2011
Posts: 332
Location: Earth
PS Version: CS6
OS: Windows 7 Professional

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2011 6:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes please provide me with more info and if possible a demo about the low / high frequency.

First of all, what is this frequency of?
View user's profile Send private message

SCTRWD

Joined: 20 Jul 2011
Posts: 78



PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2011 7:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thehermit wrote:
I would steer clear of the blur method altogether as it does not produce the result you want, and I challenge anyone to get close by doing so.

Really the only way I know that is effective is splitting the frequency of the image, into low and high pass.


Kind of strange to read it given the fact that Smart Blur and Surface Blur do just this - "frequency splitting" behind the scene :) Ever wonder what is Radius parameter in these filters for? Right! - the threshold for frequency splitting :)

I used Surface Blur for given picture and got exactly the same result as on the right picture.

Of course, you can always do everythig manually but it never hurts to know some things about PS tools and how they work :)
View user's profile Send private message

thehermit

Joined: 05 Mar 2003
Posts: 3945
Location: Cheltenham, UK


PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2011 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Will post a reply to both of the above answers when I'm more able to respond without fear of alcohol clouding my answer ;) (Cheltenham horse racing did for me today!)
_________________
If life serves you lemons, make lemonade!
View user's profile Send private message

SCTRWD

Joined: 20 Jul 2011
Posts: 78



PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2011 12:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Take your time, mate, we'll still be here :)
View user's profile Send private message

renata

Joined: 26 Nov 2010
Posts: 368
Location: Australia


PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 4:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I want to know more about Cheltenham horse races.... sorry Netaddict that's rude of me... Um, if I were a betting person I would put money on Photoshop rather than on New Suit...
View user's profile Send private message

thehermit

Joined: 05 Mar 2003
Posts: 3945
Location: Cheltenham, UK


PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was going to write a long winded reply, but in actual fact find it slight pointless as others have trod this well worn path before. So I will simply add a couple of links for people to read at their leisure. No point going over stuff that folk better than I have prepared :)
Split Frequency

Using the above technique for splitting the image into various frequencies, by working on the low pass (blurred layer), it is easier to get rid of the creases in fabrics, whilst maintaining texture.
Not to bore with my diatribe I point you to Sean Bakers blog, I think it's all fascinating, but read on from Dirty Secrets/Dirty Tricks and down SB's Blog

There is loads of information out there on the technique and the ins and outs or limitations , I don't intend to add to them ;)

And @SCTRWD, I almost laughed at your response because you state a pretty simple fact, that and under all the bells and whistles splitting frequency is also 'blurring'. It does contain some distinct advantages though, bandpass sharpening is possible and a few others. I didn't mean to dismiss your method so offhandedly, as we all know results are in the end what it important.

renata, all you need know about horseracing is that I have no nack for picking anything other than donkeys and nags. Not one win yesterday Frown

_________________
If life serves you lemons, make lemonade!
View user's profile Send private message

SCTRWD

Joined: 20 Jul 2011
Posts: 78



PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2011 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

@thehermit, just the other way around: I stated the simple fact that Surface Blur uses "splitting frequency". Just like some other filters do - Unsharp mask, for example.

Splitting frequency tecnique has been around for quite some time and been incorporated in many tools and filters. They just do it more friendly and screen the gory details from the user.

I've been using raw frequency tecnique for some years by now for some complex cases where it took several frequency bands to isolate the problem areas.

But I don't think this is the case here.

Having said that I think we should stop throwing dirt at each other... Unless you think different, of course :)

P.S. Glad you had some laughs, anyway. They say it makes your life longer :)
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    PhotoshopForums.com Forum Index -> Manipulation All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


< Advertising - Contact - Disclosure Policy - Link to Us - Staff - Support Us - User Guidelines >

Copyright © 2003-2014. PhotoshopForums.com, iFroggy Network. All Rights Reserved.
We Support phpBBHacks.com. Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group. phpBB SEO. Privacy Policy.
We are in no way affiliated with Adobe. Photoshop, Adobe and related marks are registered trademarks of Adobe.
PhotoshopForums.com